The Cognitive Rampage Podcast #171: Jason MacKenzie

The Cognitive Rampage Podcast #171: Jason MacKenzie

The Cognitive Rampage Podcast #171: Jason MacKenzie

Jason is the best-selling author of The DADLY Book of Open. He is a survivor of his wife’s tragic battle with bipolar disorder, eventual suicide and his decade-long battle with alcohol. He’s learned that sharing the real version of our stories is one of the most powerful ways we can connect with people. Jason speaks and host The Mental Health Warriors Podcast and online community. He teaches that you can’t outrun grief, no matter how hard you might try. Jason’s mission in life is to inspire people to understand that sharing who we really are is our gift. When we do, we create a safe place for other people to be who they really are. When two authentic people connect with each other the possibilities for creation are limitless.

Jason is a Mental Health Warrior. His mission is to destroy stigma and help people find the courage to share their stories.

He’s a father, husband, son and friend.

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The Cognitive Rampage Podcast #170: Mental Health Warriors Interview

The Cognitive Rampage Podcast #170: Mental Health Warriors Interview

The Cognitive Rampage Podcast #170: Mental Health Warriors Interview

Interview of Adam Lowery from Mental Health Warriors by Jason MacKenzie and Brian Knowler

My name is Adam Brett Lowery. I am a Mental Health Counselor, Author, Host of The Cognitive Rampage Podcast and a Mental Trainer. I also take an activist role in treatment reform. I founded the diagnosis Athletes Depression, and the integrative psychological approach Transrational Structural Behavior Theory (TSBT). In my heart I am a father, son, brother, friend and humanitarian. In my spirit I am a teacher and protector.

Through a emotionally, verbally and sometimes physically violent childhood my only focus was my dream to play Professional Football. A college injury ended my NFL dreams. Angry, I chose a life of drug dealing that soon entwined with addiction. I transitioned to the nightclub business a saw quick success, but violence and addiction followed. I kept it masked by money and parties. One night after a random sixteen hour life contemplation session I left my career, gave away all my things, left a four year relationship and friends behind to embark on my walkabout, or what I now call my Spiritual Rampage

For 2 years I wandered from the Florida Keys to Tennessee, even a First Nation Reservation in New Mexico. I returned home a man on a mission to change self and help others do the same. Within 4 years I completed 2 degrees, published The Cognitive Rampage, launched a podcast and founded the Athletes Depression diagnosis. I Cognitively Rampage (Speak) on all things mental health, all social issues connected to mental health and athlete specific related mental health.

In my flow time you will find me in the great outdoors. I surf, dive, spearfish, kayak and offshore fish, hike, hunt my food and have survived on a deserted island. If nature isn’t calling, you’ll find me at reggae concerts, music festivals or cooking for friends and family. I have a serious addiction to the minimalist lifestyle, the road, podcasts, competence, new experiences and randomness. I talk to strangers, and too much. I love everybody, including you. A secret about this book; my Life Philosophy is hidden within these pages, just like yours.

I believe uncomfortable is where the change is. I believe in the power of you.

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The 2nd Edition of The Cognitive Rampage,
a scientific approach to self discovery, change and optimization Amazon

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The Cognitive Rampage Podcast #169: Patricia Baugh

The Cognitive Rampage Podcast #169: Patricia Baugh

The Cognitive Rampage Podcast #169: Patricia Baugh

Patricia did not experience typical childhood being the daughter of a self proclaimed Prophet with nearly 30 children and 4 wives. Patricia talks about what is was like, why she left young and how she made it to be a successful business owner while raising 4 (now adult) children on her own.

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The 2nd Edition of The Cognitive Rampage,
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Tribe of Change Podcast #1: Things don’t get better

Tribe of Change Podcast #1: Things don’t get better

Tribe of Change Podcast #1: Things don’t get better

Welcome to the Tribe of Change Podcast in conjunction with the Cognitive Rampage Podcast. We are the Tribe, and we are here to love and support one another while we dig deeper into ourselves and the world. I’m your host Steve Stone, and I’m here to let you know that things don’t get better. ….. but I’ll tell you what does.

“Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot,
Nothing is going to get better. It’s not.” – Dr. Seuss

 

Not so competitive competition; playing games not matches.

Not so competitive competition; playing games not matches.

Not so competitive competition; playing games not matches.

It is safe to say that the well is pretty much empty today. Part of me would like nothing more to sit and watch a film, thoughtlessly wasting my evening away and distracting myself with my phone should any thoughts pop into my head.

It’s been some years now since I played my sport competitively and nearly the same amount of time since I played it to any standard regularly. I have resigned myself, through injuries, to play only veterans matches; thankfully only played once a month. I would like to say that the result doesn’t matter and I am easier on myself about my performance, but after 16 years of competition, ranging from school sport right through to full time, I can not fully let go of seeking validation from the success of victory or a match well played.

It wasn’t always like this. I remember playing sports at school with my friends, running around a football pitch in the bright sun or even the rain, with scores up in the double figures and never really caring about the result until someone called “next goal wins”. The joy was in the playing, the time spent with friends, the time spent outside at break time. I cared about the result, I always have and, seeing how I approach activities today, I think I always will, but my enjoyment never wavered.

Me evading some BPRUFC players during the EDF Intermediate Cup Final (2009)

From games to matches

It wasn’t until I found a sport I was better at than most that my level of enjoyment started to shift in line with my subjective perception of my performance or the result of the game. If I had played an individual sport, success would have rested solely on my shoulders but finding my gift and passion for a team sport, there were so many factors that could determine my mood when I stepped off that pitch. I could have the game of my life and feel completely void of positivity because the result went against us; we had lost…..I had lost. If my performance was poor, win or lose, I had lost by playing poorly.

Chester Legends (2015) — The beginning of retirement and veterans sport

From matches back to games

Fast forward to today; having played a “fun” veterans match over the weekend, it felt good. We won, a lot of my old teammates were there or playing as well and we all went to the bar after; just like old times. As I was getting the odd pat on the back for my two scores and general performance, I couldn’t help but replay the match in my head and think “if only I’d passed there instead of….”, “if only I’d tried to step that guy instead of…” I had to consciously and deliberately snap myself out of it.

There I was, retired for a few seasons now, far from being match fit, with no skills training or match experience for some time and I couldn’t help reverting to the mindset I had when I was at the peak of competition. I have thought before, and I think now about all those who, like me, had competed at some level and now stood in a bar surrounded by their friends feeling empty or disappointed. Maybe, they are out of sport completely and they are watching the sport they used to compete in. As the match plays out the greater that feeling of emptiness grows as the realisation hits that they are missing a huge part of their identity and have failed to fill the hole with something else.

Obstacle “race” 2013

…..and after it all

I wish I could say I filled that hole. I’ve had long enough, right? I can’t say that though. I play the odd veterans match and have taken up long distance running. The hole is still there though. When I’m not playing the odd match, I run. It started as a way of doing something, anything, to busy my body and my mind at the weekend when I was so used to playing. At first, I plodded along sucking in gulps of air, feeling like I was chewing my way through it, I’d get home and check the time, and I would feel okay. I’d go out for shorter runs during the week and then the weekend would come, I would lace up my trainers and I’d set off checking my run app every half mile to make sure I was on course to beat my last record. Already I was back in competition but with nobody to compete with, I competed with myself.

That would not be a bad thing if I weren’t so competitive. I would run until my lungs felt like they were going to burst to beat my last time and if I didn’t, I would get home, shower and feel like I’d lost for the rest of the day.

I’ve come a long way since I have retired, at coming to terms with no longer going to training and matches with my friends. Socializing, competing, winning but deep down, whether it’s a “fun” veterans rugby match or my weekend solo run; I am still a competitor….if only against myself.

 

Matt Sheen

Matt Sheen

TOC Blogger

I used to play rugby; now I run up mountains & write stuff

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